In the decades-long controversy over stem cell research, misinformation abounds. From a medical perspective, the debate is settled: research that destroys human embryos has not produced a single validated treatment for any disease, much less delivered on sweeping promises of miraculous cures. Adult stem cells, harvested ethically from sources like bone marrow and umbilical cord blood, as well as induced pluripotent stem cells created by the reengineering of body cells, are already saving lives and revolutionizing medicine. CLI has extensively documented the validated, peer-reviewed science on adult stem cells, making the case that policy leaders have a responsibility to put the patient first and fund therapies with a proven record of success.

Major Step Forward for Ethical Stem Cell Research

Eugene C. Tarne  

A major New England biotech company recently announced that it would begin the process that it hopes will result in the first clinical trial using induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs).     This is hardly surprising, as the discovery, by Shinya Yamanaka, of the process to produce embryonic-like, fully pluripotent stem cells from ordinary somatic (body) cells has […]

The Ethical Stems of Good Science

Eugene C. Tarne  

This paper examines the funding pattern of the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine, an institution which characterizes itself as the “largest source of funding for stem cell research outside the NIH.” Tarne demonstrates that funding has moved from grants directed primarily towards embryonic stem cell research toward primarily ethical stem cells research – which has been the only stem cell research to date to result in positive treatments for illnesses.

Possible Adult Stem Cell Therapy for Blood-Disorders in Down Syndrome

Eugene C. Tarne  

A recent study from researchers at the University of Washington announced a major step forward in the treatment of genetic diseases and specifically in treating Down syndrome patients.     Down syndrome occurs when there is an extra copy of chromosome 21 (hence its alternative name, Trisomy 21) in the individual’s genetic makeup, causing the physical and mental […]

Dr. Yamanaka’s Nobel Prize a Victory for Ethical Stem Cell Research

Eugene C. Tarne  

The Nobel Prize for Medicine awarded to Japan’s Shinya Yamanaka last month is a thoroughly deserved recognition of his groundbreaking work in regenerative medicine, work that just five years ago forever changed the way stem cell research is conducted around the globe.     It is also welcome recognition for a man who took seriously the ethical […]

The Trend Towards Ethical Stem Cell Success Continues

Eugene C. Tarne  

Two recent developments involving the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM) again serve to underscore the reality that adult and other non-embryonic avenues of stem cell research are advancing at a far more dramatic pace toward providing actual therapeutic benefits for patients than is human embryonic stem cell research (hESCR).