Tag Archives: Down syndrome

Overview of Legislation and Litigation Involving Protections Against Down Syndrome Discrimination Abortion

Amanda Stirone Mansfield, J.D.  

To view this report as a PDF, see: Overview of Legislation and Litigation Involving Protections Against Down Syndrome Discrimination Abortion   Last updated: March 21, 2019.   Five states have enacted legislation to prohibit the eugenic practice of Down syndrome discrimination abortion. Courts have enjoined the law in three of the states. Several additional states have […]

Freedom of Speech and the Truth about Life

Charlotte Lozier Institute  

by Kevin Petrisek   On Tuesday, March 20, the Supreme Court heard oral argument in NIFLA v. Becerra. The legal defense group working on the case, Alliance Defending Freedom, summarized this case well. It stated that the California law at issue forces pro-life pregnancy help centers to provide free advertising for the abortion industry. The […]

Fact Sheet: Responses Regarding Poor Prenatal Diagnosis

Charlotte Lozier Institute  

This fact sheet outlines the various responses to a “poor prenatal diagnosis” for a fetal abnormality, noting especially recent medical advances well as the life-affirming option for perinatal hospice.

CLI President Chuck Donovan: Eliminating Down Syndrome Children Is Not Something to Be Proud Of

Charles A. “Chuck” Donovan  

In a recent op-ed at The Daily Signal, CLI President Chuck Donovan responded to tragic news about the disappearance of children with Down Syndrome from Iceland due to genetic screening and abortion: This week, the CBS News program “On Assignment” included a long feature on what it described as the near eradication of Down syndrome in Iceland. […]

Issues in Law and Medicine Spring 2017 Summaries

Nora Sullivan, M.P.A  

Issues in Law and Medicine is a peer-reviewed professional journal that has been published twice a year since 1985. It is currently cosponsored by the Watson Bowes Research Institute and the National Legal Center for the Medically Dependent & Disabled, Inc. The new issue (spring 2017) includes a fine article by CLI associate scholar Nora Sullivan, M.P.A., cowritten with Dr. Eoghan de Faoite., an Irish physician committed to the sanctity of human life. This edition of the journal includes many other articles of current significance. We summarize them here. Further information about the journal and how to access current and past articles can be found at http://issuesinlawandmedicine.com/. We highly recommend ILM.

Q&A with the Scholars: Down Syndrome and Prenatal Testing

Charlotte Lozier Institute  

I believe that the decision to abort is responsible for far more sadness and family difficulties than the acceptance of a child with Down syndrome who truly does bring a family’s capacity for love to a whole new level.

France’s Act of Censorship Embraces Fear

Charlotte Lozier Institute  

On June 25, 2014, France’s Superior Council of Audiovisual Content reprimanded four television channels for airing a 30-second version of Dear Future Mom during commercial breaks. Created for World Down Syndrome Day, the video features 15 young people diagnosed with Down syndrome. In the video, the young men and women respond to a concerned mother who has just learned her unborn child faces the same diagnosis.

BBC’s “A World Without Down Syndrome?” Documentary Challenges Practice of Disability-Selective Abortion

Charlotte Lozier Institute  

Imagine you live in San Francisco and decide to move to Flagstaff, Arizona. You meet a friend one evening at a social event, and during your conversation, mention your intention to move. Your friend expresses horror at the idea (even though he has never been). “But why,” he says “would you choose to live in Arizona? It’s hot and filled with deserts.”

Baby;s feet

Ending Lethal Discrimination before Birth

Tim Bradley  

On March 24 of this year Indiana Governor Mike Pence signed into law legislation that forbids doctors from performing an abortion, before or after the unborn child reaches 20 weeks of post-fertilization age, if the reason for the abortion is based on the “race, color, national origin, ancestry, sex, or diagnosis or potential diagnosis of the fetus having Down syndrome or any other disability.”

In his statement announcing his signing of the bill, Pence said, “I believe that a society can be judged by how it deals with its most vulnerable—the aged, the infirm, the disabled and the unborn.

Celebrating World Down Syndrome Day: Societal Inclusion for Prenatally Diagnosed Unborn Babies

Genevieve Plaster, M.A.  

This year, the theme is “’My Friends, My Community’ – The benefits of inclusive environments for today’s children and tomorrow’s adults.” Highlighting the many ways in which people with Down syndrome are included in society is a noble goal – one which should naturally encompass the inclusion of unborn babies who are prenatally diagnosed with Down syndrome and who have all too often become vulnerable to abortion.

World Down Syndrome Day: Celebrating Life and Facing Challenges of Prenatal Discrimination

Charlotte Lozier Institute  

Today is a very special day for all those living with Down syndrome and for all those who love them. Today is a day to celebrate the special gifts those living with Down syndrome bring to our human family. It is also a day to celebrate the progress made from a time when those living with Down syndrome were shunned, feared, and most often hidden away in bleak and often squalid institutions. So much has changed for the better, but there are still many challenges to overcome.

Nature Journal on Embryo Gene Manipulation: “It’s Time to Give Patients a Voice”

Genevieve Plaster, M.A.  

As the international debate continues on the use of CRISPR gene-manipulating technology on human embryos, Nature journal this week gave serious consideration to concerns about its societal consequences. In a news feature entitled, “Should you edit your child’s genes?” author Erika Check Hayden takes a refreshingly humane approach by asking people with disabilities what they think of the real-life prospect of “editing out” genes responsible for disability before a person is even born.

Reflections on the Americans with Disabilities Act 25 Years Later

Charlotte Lozier Institute  

July 26 marks a momentous anniversary for persons with disabilities living in the United States. On that day in 1990, President George H. W. Bush signed into law the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), the first legislation of its kind focused solely on prohibiting discrimination against persons with disabilities and mandating that all Americans be accorded equality in pursuing jobs, goods, services and other opportunities.

The ADA has radically improved the lives of those living with disabilities over the last 25 years, especially in the areas of accessibility, education, and employment. However, laws can only protect individuals from institutionalized discrimination. Twenty-five years later, forms of discrimination can still be seen to a greater or lesser extent in American societal attitudes – perhaps even more so in attitudes toward and fears about those with mental illness and intellectual disabilities.

Charlotte Lozier Institute Co-Hosts U.S. Premiere of Jerome Lejeune Documentary

Charlotte Lozier Institute  

On May 6, the Charlotte Lozier Institute (CLI) is co-hosting a free screening of the new documentary film about Jerome Lejeune entitled To the Least of My Brothers and Sisters. The screening is open to the public and takes place next Wednesday in Washington, D.C.

In 1958, Lejeune discovered that Down syndrome was caused by an extra copy of the 21st chromosome. Lejeune was hailed as “The Father of Modern Genetics” for that discovery, which radically changed the course of modern medicine.

New Study: Abortion after Prenatal Diagnosis of Down Syndrome Reduces Down Syndrome Community by Thirty Percent

Charlotte Lozier Institute  

How many babies prenatally diagnosed with Down syndrome (DS) are aborted in the United States each year? Well, we don’t know. While new data suggesting lower numbers has recently been published, we continue to see most often in print a statistics of 90% – 92%. While that certainly draws attention to the horrifying reality that the majority of children prenatally diagnosed with DS are aborted, it is not accurate. That number relies on a 1999 European study with little data drawn from the U.S. There are good reasons for advocates to use the best data available to raise awareness of the problem that exists in the link between prenatal diagnosis and abortion.

World Down Syndrome Day & How One Family’s Mission Brightens Futures

Genevieve Plaster, M.A.  

This March 21st marks the 10th year of a worldwide campaign to celebrate and advocate for people with Down syndrome (DS). World Down Syndrome Day always falls on the 21st day of the third month, a meaningful selection representing the third copy of the 21st chromosome, the characteristic possessed by all individuals with Down syndrome.

This year, World Down Syndrome Day will highlight the positive contributions that families make for their loved ones and others in the DS community. The theme, “‘My Opportunities, My Choices’ – Enjoying Full and Equal Rights and the Role of Families,” was appropriately chosen because 2015 is also the 21st anniversary of the International Year of the Family as declared by the United Nations.

Ohio Passes Down Syndrome Bill Requiring Healthcare Professionals to Provide Support Information to Parents

Genevieve Plaster, M.A.  

On December 19, Ohio passed the Down Syndrome Information Act, which requires medical professionals to distribute up-to-date, evidence-based information on Down syndrome to parents who receive the diagnosis, either prenatally or after birth, that their child has Down syndrome (DS). Included in the required material is contact information for support organizations and local resources available to the parents. The Down Syndrome Information Act (Sub. HB 552), sponsored by Rep. Peter Stautberg, was signed into law along with 39 other pieces of legislation by Governor John Kasich last Friday. The bill passed the House and Senate both times with no opposing votes this November and mid-December.

Non-invasive Prenatal Screening Expands Disability Discrimination Abortion

Nora Sullivan, M.P.A  

A recent report on prenatal genetic screening from the New England Center for Investigative Reporting has caused quite a stir. The report showed significant inaccuracies in non-invasive (i.e., using blood tests and not invasive means such as chorionic villus sampling and amniocentesis) prenatal screening and told the stories of a number of women who chose to terminate based on these inaccurate test results. The report, which is the result of a three-month investigation by the group, found that prenatal testing companies are overselling the accuracy of their screening tests and doing little to inform parents and doctors of the major risk of unreliability of these test results – a circumstance that can lead to a multitude of problems.

Heart of a Champion

Charlotte Lozier Institute  

The Los Angeles Kings hockey players showed resiliency, heart and a strong will in their journey to raise Lord Stanley’s Cup for the second time in three seasons. They weren’t the only ones. Those same attributes are exemplified by Chris Sutter, son of Kings bench boss Darryl Sutter.

Improving Joyful Lives: Society’s Response to Difference and Disability

Charlotte Lozier Institute  

This paper looks at the highly complex genetic condition that is Down syndrome and society’s response to individuals with this condition. This important paper points out that while research to improve the lives of those with Down syndrome has progressed, federal funding for it lags considerably behind that for other genetic disorders. Policy recommendations are made for the support of those with this condition and their families.

Possible Adult Stem Cell Therapy for Blood-Disorders in Down Syndrome

Eugene C. Tarne  

A recent study from researchers at the University of Washington announced a major step forward in the treatment of genetic diseases and specifically in treating Down syndrome patients.     Down syndrome occurs when there is an extra copy of chromosome 21 (hence its alternative name, Trisomy 21) in the individual’s genetic makeup, causing the physical and mental […]