About Us

arrow-icon
Back to About Us
member-photo-1

Michael J. New, Ph.D.

Associate Scholar

Michael New, Ph.D. is Visiting Associate Professor of Economics at Ave Maria University in Florida, as well as an Associate Scholar at the Charlotte Lozier Institute. Additionally, he is a Fellow with the Witherspoon Institute, Princeton, New Jersey. Dr. New has both a Ph.D. in Political Science and a Master’s Degree in Statistics from Stanford University. He has served as a post-doctoral fellow at the Harvard-MIT data center and a lecturer at the University of Massachusetts, Boston. His articles have appeared in various peer-reviewed journals, three of which have examined the impact of state-level abortion legislation.

Latest Research & News

  • Hyde @ 40: Analyzing the Impact of the Hyde Amendment | September 27, 2016

    Congress enacted the first Hyde Amendment on September 30, 1976. Its passage was one of the pro-life movement’s first major legislative victories. As such, now is an apt time to look back on the amendment’s history and analyze its impact during the past 40 years.

  • Analyzing The Recent Fertility Decline in the U.S. | June 28, 2016

    Last week The Washington Examiner reported on a new study released by the Carsey School of Public Policy at the University of New Hampshire. It analyzed the declining birthrate in the United States since 2007. Even though there are more women of childbearing age, the number of births has fallen from over 4.3 million in 2007 to 3.978 million in 2015 – an 8 percent decline. If the fertility rate had remained at its 2007 level, the author estimates that there would have been 3.4 million more births during the last 8 years.

  • An Outstanding History of the Pre-Roe Pro-life Movement | May 2, 2016

    The history of the pro-life movement has received precious little attention from either journalists or academics. In 2014, Dr. and Mrs. John C. Willke published Abortion and the Pro-Life Movement: An Inside View which is the first truly comprehensive history of the modern pro-life movement. Their book first explores the history of pro-life activism before Roe v. Wade and then devotes a chapter to every year after 1973. This year, Daniel K. Williams, associate professor of history at the University of West Georgia, published Defenders of the Unborn: The Pro-Life Movement Before Roe v. Wade, a helpful augmentation to the Willke’s book.

  • On Top of Everything Else, Contraception Mandates Don’t Work | March 23, 2016

    It’s hard to believe the Obama Administration is still fighting the nuns over abortion and contraception.

    The Little Sisters of the Poor object on religious grounds to the government hijacking their health insurance plan to provide contraceptives including some that can cause abortions.

    They’ve filed a lawsuit and today the Supreme Court heard oral arguments in the case.

  • PRESS RELEASE: Lozier Scholar Submits Amicus Brief in Little Sisters Case | January 12, 2016

    Michael New, Ph.D., an Associate Scholar with the Charlotte Lozier Institute, the education arm of Susan B. Anthony List, submitted an amicus curiae brief yesterday to the U.S. Supreme Court in Zubik v. Burwell and consolidated cases.

    These cases represent a challenge against the Obamacare contraception mandate and its impact on the religious freedom of the Little Sisters of the Poor and other religious nonprofits. The religious nonprofit organizations are arguing that the so-called “accommodation” crafted by the Obama Administration violates religious freedom protections secured by the federal Religious Freedom Restoration Act (RFRA).

  • Pro-life Concerns about the Pending Expansion of Medicaid in Alaska | July 22, 2015

    Last Thursday Alaska Governor Bill Walker announced that he would use his executive authority to expand Alaska’s state Medicaid program under the federal Affordable Care Act. Walker’s proposal would extend Medicaid eligibility to all Alaskans earning less than 133 percent of the poverty line. Walker reported that he sent a letter to the Alaska legislature’s Budget and Audit Committee, giving legislators the required 45-day notice of his plan. The committee can make recommendations, but Walker said he has legal authority to move forward without the legislature’s approval.

    This action by Governor Walker will likely prompt both a political and a legal battle. Earlier this summer, the Republican-controlled state legislature rejected Walker’s plan to expand Medicaid. They even included language in the state’s budget prohibiting any such move. However, opinions from both the Alaska Department of Law and from the legislature’s legal counsel declared that the effort to block Walker likely doesn’t adhere to the state’s constitution.

  • A Pro-Life Setback in Iowa | June 25, 2015

    Pro-lifers received some disappointing news last Friday when the Iowa Supreme Court unanimously struck down Iowa’s telemed abortion ban. In 2013, the Iowa Board of Medicine issued administrative regulations that required physicians to perform in-person examinations (rather than webcam consults) on women before prescribing abortion-inducing drugs. These regulations would have effectively banned the webcam abortion practice in Iowa, in which a woman could receive the abortion-inducing drugs through a remote-controlled drawer after speaking to a doctor via webcam. However, these administrative rules set off a flurry of legal challenges. In August 2014, a Polk County District Court judge ruled to uphold the ban. However, in September the Iowa Supreme Court issued a stay on the decision, allowing telemed abortions to continue.

  • Medicaid Expansion’s Dramatic Effect on Tax-Funded Abortions in Key States | June 23, 2015

    This summer many people are anticipating the Supreme Court’s ruling in King v. Burwell. This case deals with whether health care exchange plans that are created by the federal government are eligible for federal tax subsidies. Right now the federal government is effectively running exchanges in about 34 states, a third of which allow the participation of insurance plans with elective abortion coverage. The ruling in this case has important implications for pro-life public policy. One major objection that pro-lifers had to the Affordable Care Act (ACA) was that it included taxpayer subsidies for exchange-based insurance plans that cover abortion.

  • An Analysis of How Medicaid Expansion in Alaska Will Affect Abortion Rates | May 13, 2015

    This May, the Alaska state legislature will consider legislation that would expand Alaska’s Medicaid program. In this timely analysis, CLI Associate Scholar Michael J. New, Ph.D. elaborates four ways in which a Medicaid expansion in Alaska would likely increase the state’s abortion incidence.

  • Parental Involvement Laws Decrease Teen Suicide Rate | May 11, 2012

    Dr. Michael New, adjunct scholar at the Charlotte Lozier Institute, writes on National Review Online of a new study by Sabia and Reese which shows that parental involvement laws for abortion reduce the suicide rates among teenage girls.  The teen suicide rate for teenage girls stands at roughly 5 per 100,000, according to the Center for Disease Control’s […]

  • U.S. House Constitution Subcommittee Addresses CIANA | April 4, 2012

    March was an important month for key legislation concerning human life and family life in the United States. On March 8, the House Judiciary Subcommittee on the Constitution listened to arguments for and against the Child Interstate Abortion Notification Act, more commonly known as CIANA.  Dr. Michael New, adjunct scholar at the Charlotte Lozier Institute, provided […]